The Brydons

Scotland to Canada

Bessie Scott

Female 1692 - Abt 1752  (60 years)


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  • Name Bessie Scott 
    Born 1692  Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died Abt 1752  Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3990  Brydon family tree
    Last Modified 3 Nov 2020 

    Family William Laidlaw,   b. 1691, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1775, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Children 
     1. James Laidlaw,   b. 27 Feb 1726, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +2. Robert Laidlaw,   b. 1 Feb 1728, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jun 1800, Hopehouse, Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
    +3. Margaret Laidlaw,   b. 13 May 1730, Over Phawhope, Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Dec 1813, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    +4. William Laidlaw,   b. 20 Jan 1735, Nether Phawhope, Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Mar 1829, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)
     5. Agnas Laidlaw,   b. 1738, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 1 Dec 2016 
    Family ID F1371  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1692 - Selkirkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Abt 1752 - Scotland Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Notes 
    • An exerpt from Alice Munro's 'The View from Castle Rock'...

      Here is a classic story. I heard versions of it? with different names, different feats? when I was a child growing up in Huron County, in Ontario. A stranger arrives full of fame, bragging of his abilities, and is beaten by the local champion, a simple-hearted fellow who is not even interested in a reward.

      These elements recur in another early story, in which Will goes over the hills to the town of Moffat on some errand, unaware that it is fair day, and is cajoled into taking part in a public race. He is not well dressed for the occasion and during the running his country breeches fall down. He lets them fall, kicks his way out of them, and continues running in nothing but a shirt, and he wins. There is a great fuss made of him and he gets invited to dinner in the public house with gentlemen and ladies. By this time he must have had his pants on, but he blushes anyway, and will not accept, claiming to be mortified in front of such leddies.

      Maybe he was, but of course the leddies' appreciation of such a well-favored young athlete is the scandalous and enjoyable point of the story.

      Will marries, at some point, he marries a woman named Bessie Scott, and they begin to raise their family. During this period the boy-hero turns into a mortal man, though there are still feats of strength. A certain spot in the Ettrick River becomes "Will's Leap" to commemorate a jump he made, to get help or medicine for someone who was sick. No feat, however, brought him any money, and the pressures of earning a living for his family, combined with a convivial nature, seem to have turned him into a casual bootlegger. His house is well situated to receive the liquor that is being smuggled over the hills from Moffat. Surprisingly this is not whiskey, but French brandy, no doubt entering the country illegally by way of the Solway Firth? as it will continue to do despite the efforts late in the century of Robert Burns, poet and exciseman. Phaup becomes well known for occasions of carousing or at least of high sociability. The hero's name still stands for honorable behavior, strength, and generosity, but no more for sobriety.

      Bessie Scott dies fairly young, and it is probably after her death that the parties have begun. The children will have been banished, most likely, to some outbuilding or the sleeping loft of the house. There does not appear to have been any serious outlawry or loss of respectability. The French brandy may be worth noting, though, in the light of the adventures that come upon Will in his maturity.

      Here is a classic story. I heard versions of it? with different names, different feats? when I was a child growing up in Huron County, in Ontario. A stranger arrives full of fame, bragging of his abilities, and is beaten by the local champion, a simple-hearted fellow who is not even interested in a reward.

      These elements recur in another early story, in which Will goes over the hills to the town of Moffat on some errand, unaware that it is fair day, and is cajoled into taking part in a public race. He is not well dressed for the occasion and during the running his country breeches fall down. He lets them fall, kicks his way out of them, and continues running in nothing but a shirt, and he wins. There is a great fuss made of him and he gets invited to dinner in the public house with gentlemen and ladies. By this time he must have had his pants on, but he blushes anyway, and will not accept, claiming to be mortified in front of such leddies.

      Maybe he was, but of course the leddies' appreciation of such a well-favored young athlete is the scandalous and enjoyable point of the story.

      Will marries, at some point, he marries a woman named Bessie Scott, and they begin to raise their family. During this period the boy-hero turns into a mortal man, though there are still feats of strength. A certain spot in the Ettrick River becomes "Will's Leap" to commemorate a jump he made, to get help or medicine for someone who was sick. No feat, however, brought him any money, and the pressures of earning a living for his family, combined with a convivial nature, seem to have turned him into a casual bootlegger. His house is well situated to receive the liquor that is being smuggled over the hills from Moffat. Surprisingly this is not whiskey, but French brandy, no doubt entering the country illegally by way of the Solway Firth? as it will continue to do despite the efforts late in the century of Robert Burns, poet and exciseman. Phaup becomes well known for occasions of carousing or at least of high sociability. The hero's name still stands for honorable behavior, strength, and generosity, but no more for sobriety.

      Bessie Scott dies fairly young, and it is probably after her death that the parties have begun. The children will have been banished, most likely, to some outbuilding or the sleeping loft of the house. There does not appear to have been any serious outlawry or loss of respectability. The French brandy may be worth noting, though, in the light of the adventures that come upon Will in his maturity.