The Brydons

Scotland to Canada

James Brydon

Male 1808 - 1887  (79 years)


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  • Name James Brydon 
    Born 12 Mar 1808  , Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1841  Moodlaw, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • He's a farmer.
    Residence 1851  Moodlaw, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • He's a farmer.
    Residence 1861  Moodlaw, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • He's a farmer.
    Residence 1881  Kinnelhead, Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • He's a farmer of 4000 acres pastoral, employing 6 men and 3 girls. Widowed.
    Died 14 Dec 1887  Knocknarling, Kells, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2494  Brydon family tree
    Last Modified 8 Jan 2018 

    Father Thomas Bryden,   b. 1771,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Isabella Tait,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 12 Jun 1796  , Innerleithen, Peeblesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F2855  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Janet Halliday Renwick,   b. 13 Mar 1814, , Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Sep 1873, Kinnelhead, Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Children 
    +1. Elizabeth Brydon,   b. 1834, , Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Isabella Brydon,   b. 1836, Kirkpatrick-Fleming, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Thomas Brydon,   b. 1838, , Ettrick, Selkirkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. James Brydon,   b. 16 Aug 1840, , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. Herbert Brydon,   b. 15 Jul 1842, , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1927, RM Westbourne, Manitoba, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     6. Christina Brydon,   b. 3 Jul 1844, , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Margaret Brydon,   b. 1846, , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. Christina Brydon,   b. 25 Aug 1850, , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. Janet Brydon,   b. 2 Apr 1855, , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +10. William Brydon,   b. 25 Nov 1859, , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 May 1945, RM Westbourne, Manitoba, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
    Last Modified 3 Aug 2010 
    Family ID F834  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 12 Mar 1808 - , Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1841 - Moodlaw, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1851 - Moodlaw, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1861 - Moodlaw, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1881 - Kinnelhead, Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 14 Dec 1887 - Knocknarling, Kells, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Histories
    'A prominent sheep-farmer and breeder of Cheviots'
    "A prominent sheep-farmer and breeder of Cheviots"

  • Notes 
    • The Standard Cyclopedia of Modern Agriculture and Rural Economy, by the most distinguished authorities and specialists under the editorship of Professor R. Patrick Wright .. (1908)

      Brydon, James (1807-87) was a prominent sheep-farmer and breeder of Cheviots.
      He occupied large holdings (Moodlaw, Kinnelhead, Thirlstanehope, Kirkhope, Lochanhead, Appin, and Holm of Dalquhairn) in Dumfriesshire and Kirkcudbrightshire, and for many years his stock took the highest places in the show and sale rings. As his rams were bought ? as many as 160 and 180 every second year ? for every sheep-breeding district in Scotland, Mr. Brydon was the greatest influence of his time among Cheviot sheep.

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      For several years Cheviots " were all the rage. They were developed by James Brydon, who died in 1887 (designated by himself " a man among sheep, but a sheep among men "), on the farms of Moodlaw, Eskdalemuir (till 1869), and Appin, Tynron, Dumfriesshire, Kinnelhead, and the Holm of Dalquhairn, given up in 1887. At his bi-annual sale in September at Beattock, which was discontinued about 1880, highly fed and excellently dressed rams, numbering 150 to 180, with beautiful form and stylish gait, were sold at high prices, averaging ;i 5 to 17, and there remained hardly a stock in the country that was not impregnated with the blood. A few trying years of bad weather sufficed to show that in attaining size and beauty, Brydon had got on the wrong tack, and had sacrificed hardihood.
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      http://www.cheviotsheep.org/about/history.html

      In 1832 The Highland Society began its exhibition and the earnest attention of enthusiasts was given to the improvement of the breed. James Brydon, Moodlaw and Kinnelhead, held biennial sales of his rams at Beattock, and the sheep were in great demand.
      In 1855 he sold 169 sheep of various ages, from lambs to six year olds, at an average of nine pounds thirteen shillings, while ten years later he sold the same number at an average of fourteen pounds fourteen shillings.
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      The Canada farmer, Volume 4 By W.F. Clarke

      The Moodlaw Flock.
      The following, which we clip from The Farmer (Scottish), will be read with special interest by those 10 whom the names are familiar, and by all as evidencing what perseverance will accomplish in the improvement of a flock of sheep.
      The announcement which has been made of Moodlaw having been let to a new tenant will be received in England by breeders of Cheviot with feelings akin to disappointment. "Brydon, of Moodlaw," has been known tor such a length of time as a crack designation among Cheviot men, that the disconnection of the names seems almost like the breaking up of an old, time-honoured institution. We quote the following remarks concerning the sale of the celebrated Moodlaw flock from Dixon?s " Field and Fern."
      ' The flock has been in the family for nearly eighty years, and the Cheviot pedigree goes back for fully half that time; but save an occasional grey-leg, no trace of the primitive black-face comes out. Mr. Brydon's uncle showed sheep at Stirling about 1830, and won a tea set for the best Cheviot; and in 1840 Mr. Brydon came to Moodlaw.
      "His great object has been to get them shorter and thicker, especially about the knee, or the butcher's grip, wide between the forelegs, with hard white hair on the crown, deep in the girth, well wooled below and on the arms and thighs, with a fine park-ranging neck, light and clifty in the bone, white on the legs, and black on the nose,? a flat crown and too pointed ears are points he has struggled against; and a fine Roman head, with a full and daring eye, is quite his coat of arms. He also prefers the coat rather open, as the closely planted ones ore disposed to shed their wool in the spring, when the new and old coats separate. The wool calculation is five fleeces of ewes and hoggs, and three of hill ranging tups to the twenty-tour pound stone. If a ewe nurse two lambs, she has one-third less wool, and if she is in the cast she is generally among the shotts. There aro 8,000 ewes in the flock, which have generally five crops of lumbs, and the cast has gone tor years to farmers in the district. The wether lambs are sold in August, and 120 tups are kept each year. Eight sales have been held so far, with about nine scores in each of them, and, as a general rule, the two shears sell best "Since Mr. Brydon succeeded to the flock, he has been a steady shower, at the Highland Society, Moffat, Thirlstanc, Dangholm, Dumfries, and Thornhill. Old Stirling won eleven prizes. He was a sheep of grand style, and sported a thirteen pound coat as a four shear. Old Palley was also all gaiety and life, with a very special coat, and a head which was thought worthy of stuffing. Roughie was of the Sampson kind, and a very useful Bheep, but Sampson himself was "not of an off-hand showy appearance." He was the largest Mr. Brydon ever bred, and weighed nearly nineteen and a half stones of fourteen pound, even when his season had sunk him five or six stones. As a ewe-getter there were none to compare with "The Rigglin," for which Mr. Borthwick of Hopesrigg gave ?100. Kobson, from whom many of the best ewes are descended, was a horned one, and for staple and quality of wool he was unequalled among the tups, and brought ?75 at Beattock. Horned Cheviots are generally more hardy and coarser in the coat, but Bobson's was a complete contradiction of the rule. Hornie was sold for fifty-five guineas to Mr. Patterson, Twiglees, and Mr. Elliot got his sire, who, like Old Tom, was more of a ewe-getter. The Captain (ninety-five guineas) by Old Palley, went as
      a three-shear to Mr. Borthwick ; and Mr. Graham, of the Shaw, had the remains of "Heb" in a present when he bad been used for five seasons. The old Mawkey ewe thrice shared first prize honours in a pen of five ewes and gimmers, and she had twins every year but two. Out of het twenty-two lambs one of them was Lord Clyde (the winner of eight prizes) by the Duke, and another, Sir Colin, by Heb, who won five prizes. The climax, so far as prices go, was reached, however, at the Moodlaw sale in September 14, 1865, when Mr. Elliot, of Hyndhope, gave ?121 for a two-year-old ram ; Mr. Plenderleith, Moorfoot, Peeblesshire, ?155 for a three-year- old ram; and Mr. Archibald, Duddingstone, ?115 for a fouryear-old ram. The total of rams sold on that occasion was 169, at a general average for all ages, of ?14 8s. 3d. Such prices for Cheviot sheep were unprecedented, but they were only a fitting tribute to the high excellence to which the Moodlaw has been brought by Mr. Brydon.