The Brydons

Scotland to Canada

Alexander Glendinning

Male 1807 - Aft 1881  (74 years)


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  • Name Alexander Glendinning 
    Born 23 Dec 1807  , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Aft 1881  Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2154  Brydon family tree
    Last Modified 30 Jan 2017 

    Father Archibald Glendining,   b. 4 Mar 1766, Meikleholm, Langholm, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jan 1827, Over Cassock, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Mother Mary Park,   b. 1766, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Oct 1842, Over Cassock, Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 5 Jul 1799  , Westerkirk, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F567  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 23 Dec 1807 - , Eskdalemuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Aft 1881 - Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Recordings
    Scarborough Settler's Lament
    Scarborough Settler's Lament
    written in 1840 by Sandy Glendenning who called it ‘Awa wi Scarboro’s Muddy Creeks’. Sandy was the brother-in-law of David Brydon. David and his wife Janet Glendenning stayed with Sandy in Scarborough when they first arrived in Ontario.

    The poem was turned into a song by Canadian folk-singer Stan Rogers and became a standard for Canadian singers.

    Here it is performed by Jesse Ferguson, aka The Bard of Cornwall.

    Away with Canada's muddy creeks
    And Canada's fields of pine
    Your land of wheat is a goodly land,
    But oh, it is not mine
    The heathy hill, the grassy dale.
    The daisy spangled lea,
    The purling burn and craggy linn --
    Auld Scotia's land give me.

    Oh, I would like to hear again
    The lark on Tinny's hill
    And see the wee bit gowany
    That blooms beside the rill.
    Like banished Swiss who views afar
    His Alps with longing e'e.
    I gaze upon the morning star
    That shines on my country.

    No more I'll win by Eskdale Pen
    Or Pentland's craggy comb.
    The days can ne'er come back again
    Of thirty years that's gone,
    But fancy oft at midnight hour
    Will steal across the sea.
    Yestre'en amidst a pleasant dream
    I saw my own country.

    Each scene that met my view
    Brought childhood's joys to mind.
    The blackbird sang on Tushey linn
    The song he sang lang syne.
    But like a dream time flies away
    And then the morning came.
    And I awoke in Canada,
    Three thousand miles from hame.

    Sandy Glendinning, 1840

  • Notes 
    • Nickname is Sandy.
      He wrote the poem 'Awa wi Scarboro's Muddy Creeks'. Much later the poem was turned into a song by Canadian folk-singer Stan Rogers.
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