The Brydons

Scotland to Canada

Frederick William Chubb, Jr.

Male 1906 - Yes, date unknown


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Frederick William Chubb 
    Suffix Jr. 
    Born 5 Apr 1906  York Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1937  Goudreau, Algoma Dist., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died Yes, date unknown 
    Person ID I1014  Brydon family tree
    Last Modified 27 Jul 2020 

    Family Helen Campbell,   b. 18 Jan 1910, Brampton, Peel Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1978  (Age 67 years) 
    Married 4 Jul 1934  Sault Ste. Marie, Algoma Dist., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 12 Jan 2020 
    Family ID F318  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 5 Apr 1906 - York Co., Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 4 Jul 1934 - Sault Ste. Marie, Algoma Dist., Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1937 - Goudreau, Algoma Dist., Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Notes 
    • Father: John A Chubb
      Mother: Lillian Applegate

      In the 1950s he lived in Whitby.

      " The story of Chubb Crater begins with World War II. On June 20, 1943, a U.S. Army Air Force plane, on a weather flight over the Ungava region of Quebec Province, took a photograph showing a wide crater rim thrust up above the snow-mantled landscape. Five years later the Royal Canadian Air Force covered the same little-known area in its program of photomapping all Canada. Not until 1950, however, were these photographs and resulting map corrections made available to the public. Here that sturdy prospector and frontiersman Frederick W. Chubb becomes an important figure. His interest was fired by the photographs of the strange configuration of terrain far north of the limit of wooded country. He sought me out at the museum for my opinion as a geologist. Mr. Chubb was hopeful I would tell him what he wished to hear - that the crater appeared to be that of an extinct volcano. If so, the area might hold diamond deposits similar to those found in South Africa. My interest was stirred, but for a different reason. My knowledge of Canadian geology tentatively ruled out the possibility that the crater was of volcanic origin, or a huge sinkhole left behind by retreating ice. The only other likely explanation was that this immense pockmark on northern Quebec Province was the handiwork of a mighty meteor that crashed into the land at terrific speed untold centuries ago. Eager to inspect the crater firsthand, I flew there with Fred Chubb in 1950. The visit was brief, hardly more than a reconnaissance, without time or equipment for a thorough study. I was awed then - as I have been ever since - by the stark, brooding grandeur one beholds from the crater rim."


      see also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pingualuit_crater